The Maritime Heritage Project.

Migration

Art in the Lives of Immigrant Communities in the United States (Rutgers Series – The Public Life of the Arts)tag

Prof. Paul DiMaggio (Editor), Prof. Patricia Fernandez-Kelly (Editor, Introduction), Prof. Gilberto Cardenas (Contributor), Prof. Yen Espiritu (Contributor), Prof. Amaney Jamal (Contributor), Prof. Sunaina Maira (Contributor), Prof. Douglas Massey (Contributor), Prof. Cecilia Menjivar (Contributor), Prof. Clifford Murphy (Contributor), Prof. Terry Rey (Contributor), Prof. Susan Seifert (Contributor), Dr. Alex Stepick (Contributor), Prof. Mark Stern (Contributor), Prof. Domenic Vitiello (Contributor), Prof. Deborah Wong (Contributor)

This is the first book to provide a comprehensive and lively analysis of the contributions of artists from America’s “newest” immigrant communities: Africa, the Middle East, China, India, Southeast Asia, Central America, and Mexico. Adding significantly to our understanding of both the arts and immigration, multidisciplinary scholars explore tensions that artists face in forging careers in a new world and navigating between their home communities and the larger society. They address the art forms that these modern settlers bring with them; show how poets, musicians, playwrights, and visual artists adapt traditional forms to new environments; and consider the ways in which the young people integrate their own traditions and concerns into contemporary expression.

Migration and the Origins of the English Atlantic World.Migration and the Origins of the English Atlantic World (Harvard Historical Studies, 133)tag

England’s 17th-century colonial empire in North America and the Caribbean was created by migration. The quickening pace of this essential migration is captured in the London port register of 1635, the largest extant port register for any single year in the colonial period and unique in its record of migration to America and to the European continent. Games analyzes the 7,500 people who traveled from London in that year, recreating individual careers and exploring colonial societies at a time of emerging viability.England’s seventeenth-century colonial empire in North America and the Caribbean was created by migration.

The quickening pace of this essential migration is captured in the London port register of 1635, the largest extant port register for any single year in the colonial period and unique in its record of migration to America and to the European continent. Alison Games analyzes the 7,500 people who traveled from London in that year, recreating individual careers, exploring colonial societies at a time of emerging viability, and delineating a world sustained and defined by migration. The colonial travelers were bound for the major regions of English settlement — New England, the Chesapeake, the West Indies, and Bermuda-and included ministers, governors, soldiers, planters, merchants, and members of some major colonial dynasties — Winthrops, Saltonstalls, and Eliots. Many of these passengers were indentured servants. Games shows that however much they tried, the travelers from London were unable to recreate England in their overseas outposts. They dwelled in chaotic, precarious, and hybrid societies where New World exigencies overpowered the force of custom. Patterns of repeat and return migration cemented these inchoate colonial outposts into a larger Atlantic community. Together, the migrants’ stories offer a new social history of the seventeenth century. For the origins and integration of the English Atlantic world, Games illustrates the primary importance of the first half of the seventeenth century.

~ ~ ~ ~

Read on your Kindle.

Read history on your Kindle Fire. Many of the books herein are available free or at low cost for Kindle, have been republished specifically for mobile devices, and are easy to download.

California Pioneers

 



Tags: , ,

This entry was posted on Monday, April 16th, 2012. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

Great Sea Stories.   Irish Famine Ships.   Men and Ships of the Sea.   Jack London Stories of Ships and the Sea.   The Heart of the Sea.


Copyright © 2008-2014. All Rights Reserved. The Maritime Heritage Project.
1001 Bridgeway, Suite 410, Sausalito, CA 94965, California, U.S.A.
The Maritime Heritage Project is proudly powered by WordPress
Modified by MarinEStudios from a design by Free WordPress Themes